From Virginia's Fort Monroe to Namibia's Swakopmund and Mondesa districts

Fort Monroe in Virginia.  Photo:  Tonya Fitzpatrick
Fort Monroe in Virginia. Photo: Tonya Fitzpatrick

A very talented musical group in Mondesa greets us with beautiful sounds.  Photo:  Ian Fitzpatrick

Today, World Footprints will explore elements of American history from small towns and historic hotels to Fort Monroe.  We'll also visit the shanty town of Mondesa which sits just outside of Swakopmund, Namibia.  There we will mingle with the locals and witness how black Namibians are preserving their history and traditions.

Fort Monroe in Virginia has been defending America since 1607 and today it remains the largest stone fortification in the United States.   Tour guide Robin Reed gives us the backstory of the Fort's rich history and the important role it has played in American history.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation is on a mission to preserve and share all of America's history.  We'll share the work the organization is doing and we'll introduce two interesting historic hotels in Washington, DC--the Mayflower and the Morrison-Clark.

Small towns in America are often overlooked as tourist destinations but if you really want to experience real Americana you should go off the beaten path and visit a small town where you can uncover a treasure trove of goodies. Some of the most authentic travel experiences and unique stories can be found in small and rural towns and we will explore a few. 

The beach resort of Swakopmund, Namibia is an example of German colonial architecture and culture.  However, a majority of the population of Swakopmund lives in settlements that were developed for indigenous black Namibians.  We will introduce you to some of the locals we met on a walk through the Mondesa district.

 

Traveling through American and Namibian history by WorldFootprints

Air Date: 
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 8:00pm

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