Exploring the Enchanting Tamanique Waterfalls in El Salvador

Exploring the Enchanting Tamanique Waterfalls in El Salvador

The picturesque El Salvador’s most beautiful waterfall, Tamanique Falls. Photo: Thomas Später

Posted August 9, 2023

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El Salvador’s most scenic waterfall

El Salvador, though compact in size, boasts a plethora of natural wonders waiting to be discovered. Among its treasures lies the breathtaking Tamanique waterfalls, nestled deep within a tropical forest, approximately 55 km from the international airport, 16 km from El Tunco (a renowned beach town), or 40 km from San Salvador, the capital city. The Tamanique waterfalls are a must-visit destination, but reaching this picturesque paradise requires some essential considerations.

Transportation and Navigation

Self-driving in El Salvador is generally not recommended due to inadequate mapping, unclear parking structures, and sometimes questionable road conditions. Public buses, like bus #187 from El Tunco or other beach towns, charge anywhere between 50 cents to $2. Alternatively, Uber is well-established and reliable in El Salvador, making it a hassle-free option especially for those who don’t speak Spanish. If not in possession of a local phone card, don’t forget to schedule your pick-up ahead of time. Otherwise, you may get stranded in the lovely town of Tamanique (it could be worse). For those that want to self-drive: The best option for parking is to rent a spot in the backyard of local family homes that sit across the tourism office.

Backyard parking on the opposite site of the Tamanique tourism office. Photo: Thomas Später
Backyard parking on the opposite site of the Tamanique tourism office. Photo: Thomas Später

Embarking on the Hike to Tamanique Waterfalls

To commence your hike to the Tamanique Waterfalls, begin by registering at the official tourism office located in the south-west corner of “Parque de Tamanique.” If you use “Trips & Tours Cascada Tamanique” on Google, you’ll easily find the office. Upon arrival, a tourism official will brief on the trail (in Spanish only!) and assign a guide after collecting the entrance fee of about $5. Previously, independent hiking was allowed, but recent changes now mandate hiring a guide. This could be a little costly, as the guide fee remains fixed at $20, regardless of the group size. If you are a solo traveler like I am and you want to hike the trail alone, you’ll have to pay the $20 fee on your own.

Tamanique tourism office building. Photo: Thomas Später
Tamanique tourism office building. Photo: Thomas Später

Descending to Tamanique Waterfalls

Having arrived at El Salvador’s international airport, I promptly took an Uber to Tamanique at 6.30 AM, geared up with just a backpack, eager to begin the hike. At least so I thought. As we left the tourism office and set foot on the trail, it became apparent that this wouldn’t be an easy hike. Each step downward towards the valley hinted at the challenging ascent on the way back. I traveled with a backpack only and was ready to start the hike. After a stretch of cobblestone road, a sign directed us into the forest. From there on, the descent became steep, navigating a dirt path with a combination of man-made steps and tree roots. After about 40 minutes, we encountered a closed wooden cabin, serving as a checkpoint and rest stop, offering water for purchase. At this point, two paths diverged—one leading to the valley with the main waterfall and the other to a river section above it. Both can be explored in one hiking session.

Official entrance to the waterfall with a small wooden cabin that opens around 9AM and sells water if needed (not an official shop). Photo: Thomas Später
Official entrance to the waterfall with a small wooden cabin that opens around 9AM and sells water if needed (not an official shop). Photo: Thomas Später

Reaching the Tamanique Waterfall Valley

Although multiple spots can be seen on this trip, the main waterfall, which is labeled “Waterfall #3-4”, can be reached after a steep descent about 15 minutes after passing the wooden cabin. The view during the final stretch, with its steepest steps, already reveals the beauty concealed within the narrow valley—lush green trees adorning the rocky cliffs, crystal-clear water cascading through the riverbed, and the serene melody of birdsong. After stepping into the valley, the path leads to the right (upstream), crossing over rocks that are placed inside the water and serve as a natural pathway above the waters’ surface. 

Two possible routes to see the waterfall from below (3 4) or visit the upstream river (1 2). Photo: Thomas Später
Two possible routes to see the waterfall from below (3 4) or visit the upstream river (1 2). Photo: Thomas Später

Discovering Different Perspectives

While walking upstream, the Tamanique Waterfalls reveal themselves on the right side. However, I highly recommend taking your time once you reached it and explore the area to get multiple view of this impressive water drop from different angles. For example, when moving past the main waterfall alongside the right cliff, a short rope can be utilized to get access to a smaller waterfall above some large boulders. From there, an even better view of the main waterfall can be enjoyed. 

Smaller waterfall a few steps upstream of the main Tamanique falls. Photo: Thomas Später
Smaller waterfall a few steps upstream of the main Tamanique falls. Photo: Thomas Später

Cooling Off in Refreshing Waters

After a strenuous hike in the heat, there’s nothing better than refreshing in the natural waters of Tamanique Falls. Despite the water’s appearance of depth, exercise caution, as the ground beneath it drops sharply in some areas. My guide told me stories of him getting in the water to rescue a few people that ran in the water but couldn’t swim. So if you’re not a swimmer, please be careful. Other than that, hanging out right below the waterdrop is an incredible awesome feeling and should not be missed!

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Arachnophobes Beware

Nature is home to various creatures, including spiders, and the Tamanique valley, especially around the main waterfall, teems with them. If you’re uneasy around these arachnids, consider yourself warned. Large, fast-moving spiders, some hand-sized, are commonly found on the shady side of stones and tree branches, and they might catch you by surprise if you wander carelessly.

Huge spiders can be seen everywhere around the waterfall area, particularly in shady spots close to the water. Photo: Thomas Später
Huge spiders can be seen everywhere around the waterfall area, particularly in shady spots close to the water. Photo: Thomas Später

The Ascent Challenge

Unless you regularly work out with a “step-master” at the gym, the uphill journey will prove arduous. To make it more enjoyable (tolerable), and due to the long and unforgiving incline over many hundreds of steep stairs, I recommend two things. First, make your way down really early since both temperature and humidity rise quickly between 9 and 10 am. Second, make your way down to the main waterfall first and visit all other spots on the way up. Breaking the climb into smaller segments will make it feel less daunting compared to conquering the entire ascent in one go.

Planning Your Visit

In my opinion, visiting Tamanique Falls is a perfect half-day trip. While the way down may take about an hour and the ascent roughly an hour and a half, spending 45—60 minutes in the valley surely is enough. I highly recommend catching some local food in the small town of Tamanique before heading out as well.

Cover photo by Thomas Später.

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  • Thomas Später, PhD, is an experienced backpacking traveler that specializes in adventurous trips around the globe. He has traveled to remote and exotic places, such as Namibia or Mongolia and focuses on landscape and wildlife photography to share the beauty of our planet with others. In 2021, Thomas published a (German) book about Overpopulation and Over-consumption (Die Überbevölkerung). With his awareness of current global issues, he uses his travels to support particularly local hotels and restaurants to raise awareness for the nature and culture of his destinations. Follow Thomas´ adventures on Instagram as well as on his website, World In Frames.